EHSSENTIALS 2017
 

Sessions

Choose and attend any sessions from any track on the day of the Symposium; no pre-selection is required.

Symposium Agenda – Friday, April 28, 2017

  • 8:00 – 8:30 AM

     
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    Registration & Coffee

  • 8:30 – 9:30 AM

     

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    Welcome

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    Keynote Speaker

    The Future: Threat Safety Science
    Dr. Charles R. Denham, M.D, Founder, Global Patient Safety Forum; Chairman, TMIT
    William H. Adcox, Chief Security Officer, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center; Chief of Police, The University of Texas Houston Police Department

    No matter how good we are at leading efforts in our silos, we are not managing the total risk of our organizations, especially with the “threat velocity” we are now experiencing. We need to move from “Silo Saviors” to “Matrix Masters”. Our threat assessment and risk management activities to date have been naturally organized with tactical focus. We must move to strategic focus and tactical excellence. If all of the threats and risks of an institution are assembled in a grid as is done for many high performing organizations, they become a threat matrix and co-dependencies, causal relationships, and opportunities for rapid response become more clear. The rapid evolution of international and domestic threats demands that every organization move Left of Boom.

    We also have to move beyond Protection at the time of an event, and move upstream not only to Preparedness, but to Prevention — both primary prevention to make sure certain things never happen AND secondary prevention, making sure the damage is minimized, the disruption of function is shortened, and the recovery is least costly and complete (target hardening).

    Lastly – using a discipline pioneered in patient safety and aviation – we need to learn Performance Improvement tools and skills that can be applied to the former three P’s. We need multidisciplinary cross functional teams working across silos to develop new integrated strategies to build three new systems: new leadership systems that can build trust and drive success through the development of people; best practice systems that help us during a crisis to fall to a new level of training (knowing we don’t rise to the level of our knowledge, but fall to the level of our training); and, new technology systems that enable the former two.

    By becoming a learning organization applying the discipline of great teams, we can be rapid responders, use “big data”, and become much more efficient. We are able to know what we don’t know and put that to work – this is the future of Threat Safety Science.

  • 9:30 – 9:45 AM

     
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    Transition/Networking

  • 9:45 – 10:45 AM

     

  • Track A

    Health and Safety’s Role in Mitigating the Insider Threat Risk

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    Scott Patlovich, DrPH, CBSP, SM(NRCM), CHMM, CPH, Director of Environmental, Health & Safety, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UT Health)

    While healthcare organizations maintain many layers of controls to prevent outsiders from gaining unauthorized access to cause loss or harm, persons who have been granted legitimate access can become an “insider threat”. Although the typical insider targets assets or data, in some cases their actions can also have significant impacts on workplace and environmental health and safety. Because much of an organization’s safety program activities are carried out with the workers in their workplace, this represents a unique opportunity to assist in the possible detection of insider threats. This presentation will discuss the threats represented by insiders so that health & safety professionals can enhance their situational awareness and report suspicions to the appropriate authorities.

    In this session attendees will learn how to understand and recognize the different types of insider threats; review the common traits of insider threats and the challenges of identifying these traits; and understand their role as a health and safety professional to potentially help identify and report insider threats to the appropriate authorities.


  • Track B

    The RICE/TMC Flood Alert System: Data-Driven Emergency Management Decision Making

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    Bryan Evans, UT Health Risk Management and Emergency Management, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UT Health)
    Devina Patel, Director for Environmental Health Safety and Corporate Services, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

    In order to remain disaster resilient, healthcare organizations must anticipate and prepare for both manmade and natural disasters. Significant historic high water events wreaking havoc in Houston, and in particular the Texas Medical Center, have required hospitals and clinics in the area to develop robust flood prevention and mitigation plans. This presentation will introduce The Rice University and Texas Medical Center Flood Alert System online tool, its real-time information features, and how information provided by this tool is being used and interpreted to implement critically important flood prevention and mitigation steps.

    This session will provide an understanding of how healthcare institutions in the Texas Medical Center prepare for potential flooding events in order to minimize losses and business interruption; an introduction to the Rice University Flood Alert System and the information provided within this tool; and, a review of the decision trees used at UT Health and MD Anderson Cancer Center based on information obtained through the Flood Alert System and the steps taken to prevent catastrophic flooding events.

  • 10:45 – 11:00 AM

     
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    Transition/Networking

  • 11:00 – 12:00 NOON

     

  • Track A

    Case Study: Proven Best Practices and Strategies for Injury Reduction

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    Christy Foster, Principal Consultant and VP of Sales and Marketing, BSI EHS Services and Solutions

    What’s working? What’s not? What are leading organizations doing to reduce/minimize injuries, increase productivity, and ultimately improve the patient care experience? This session will provide a unique glimpse into the best practices and strategies that top hospitals are using today – presented in case study format to illustrate how applying these practices can help drive significant improvement in injury rates, workers comp costs, and lost time due to injuries.


  • Track B

    High Consequence Pathogens

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    Shawn Gibbs, Executive Associate Dean and Professor, Indiana University School of Public Health-Bloomington

    The health of communities can be positively and meaningfully impacted by providing well-designed, well-delivered, practical, hands-on health, environmental infection control, and safety training to mitigate exposures to Ebola virus disease (EVD) and other serious infectious diseases of public health significance to workers who may have a potential exposure. In this presentation, attendees will hear how this Community Level model can be used to develop critical awareness of infectious diseases of public health significance, with emphasis on education about disease transmission and the environmental persistence of organisms. The long term objectives are to prepare workers and communities for the actual risks associated with EVD and other serious infectious diseases, and to protect themselves, their colleagues, and their environment from these exposures using sound scientific methods and to promote the health, resiliency and financial stability of workers and their communities.

  • 12:00 – 1:00 PM

     
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    Lunch/Networking

  • 1:00 – 2:00 PM

     

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    Round Table Panel Discussion
    EHS Heads Q&A
    Dr. Matthew Berkheiser, Executive Director of the Environmental Health and Safety Department, MD Anderson Cancer Center
    Melissa A. Murrah, J.D., Director, Risk Management, Safety Officer, Texas Children’s Hospital
    Dr. Janelle Rios, MPH, PhD, Director of the Office of Public Health Practice and Career Services, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) School of Public Health
    Scott Patlovich, DrPH, CBSP, SM(NRCM), CHMM, CPH, Director of Environmental, Health & Safety, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UT Health)
    Michael Jones, Texas Division Manager – Environmental Health & Safety, CHI St. Luke’s Health
    Danial Bravard, Associate Vice President – Risk Management and Safety Workplace Safety Officer, Memorial Hermann Health System

    Please join us for our EHS Round Table Panel Discussion where top industry healthcare leaders will provide their perspective on a wide range of current and emerging topics. The discussion will include time for audience participation and questions. Topics may include:

    • Emerging EHS Trends and Risks in Healthcare
    • Leadership Development
    • Staff Optimization
    • 2017 Healthcare Outlook
  • 2:00 – 2:15 PM

     
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    Transition/Networking

  • 2:15 – 3:15 PM

     

  • Track A

  • Track B

    Understanding United States Pharmacopeia (USP) 800 and How to Incorporate into USP 797 Programs

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    Doug Rush, CIH, CSP, CHMM, Principal Consultant, BSI EHS Services and Solutions

    Designed to provide “state of the art” thought and best management practices for Hazardous Drug (HD) management, this talk is targeted at the control of employee exposure to HDs and the incorporation of USP 797/800.

    This review will provide criteria for classifying drugs as hazardous; summarize and update the evidence supporting the management of HDs as an occupational hazard; discuss the elements of a comprehensive safety and health plan for HDs and the recommended worker education, as well as the legal requirements of applicable standards for the protection of workers exposed and potentially exposed to HDs; and, update the important aspects of medical surveillance; and5. Reference and describe the NIOSH HDs list that is currently in use.

  • 3:15 – 3:30 PM

     
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    Transition/Networking

  • 3:30 – 4:30 PM

     
  • Track A

    EH&S Leadership Development – A Self-Contained Study

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    Dr. Matthew Berkheiser, Executive Director of the Environmental Health and Safety Department, MD Anderson Cancer Center

    In order to be successful in an academic medical center the EH&S professional must be both technically competent and have the soft skills and political awareness to navigate the system they are supporting. This session will help participants understand and recognize methods to develop EH&S staff to be a bette,r stronger team of leaders; provide an introduction to the Gallup StrengthsFinder and CoreClarity, Inc. material; and introduce methods, tools and interactive opportunities to share with your staff to help them be a better team.

    Strengths-based teamwork and self-awareness tools will be discussed during this brief look at an EH&S team and the tools they have used to develop their leadership skills. If you have taken the Gallup StrengthsFinder assessment and have your top five strengths, bring them to this session for more insight into what makes you a strong EH&S professional.

  • Track B

    Hospital Hazardous Waste and Environmental Law: Enforcement Risks and Essential Management Strategies

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    Pat Larkin, Partner, Strasburger’s Attorney at Law

    Hospitals implement (and coordinate) numerous complex regulatory programs. Six-figure penalties in recent EPA enforcement cases suggest that hospitals struggle to correctly identify and manage hazardous waste generated in pharmacy, labs, maintenance and clinical operations. A pending EPA rulemaking would require hospitals to choose between current programs and drastically broadened pharmacy waste management requirements. This presentation will provide tools to identify and manage these challenges, and provide attendees with a basic understanding of (1) How to identify when various hospital chemicals and pharmaceuticals become solid and hazardous wastes; (2) State and federal enforcement responses to mis-identified and thus, mis-managed hazardous wastes; (3) Hospital operations with potential to mis-identify hazardous waste; (4) EPA’s 2016 Proposed Rule on Pharmaceutical Hazardous Waste – if finalized, may fundamentally change management of pharma inventory and wastes; and (5) How to correctly incorporate waste identification into existing compliance systems.

  • 4:30 – 4:45 AM

     
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    Closing Session and Gift Giveaway

Environmental, Health & Safety Symposium for Healthcare