EHSSENTIALS 2018
 

Sessions

Choose and attend any sessions from any track on the day of the Symposium; no pre-selection is required.

Symposium Agenda – Friday, October 12, 2018

  • 8:00 – 8:30 AM

     
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    Registration & Coffee

  • 8:30 – 8:45 AM

     
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    Welcome and Opening Remarks

  • 8:45 – 9:30 AM

     

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    Keynote

    Surge Planning – A Paradigm Shift

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    Richard C. Hunt, MD, FACEP, Senior Medical Advisor, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

    Recent disaster responses, such as the mass shooting in Las Vegas in October 2017 have highlighted the challenges related to surge planning, especially where “just in Time” supply chain management and social media as the major source of news has become the norm. Mr. Gabriel will discuss what we have learned from events like the Vegas shooting, and the shift that is occurring in healthcare around how we plan for patient surge.

  • 9:30 – 9:45 AM

     
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    Transition/Networking

  • 9:45 – 10:45 AM

     

  • Track A

    Aligning Patient Mobilization with Early Mobility Initiatives

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    Tamara James, MA, CPE, CSPHP, Ergonomics Director, Duke University and Health System

    A successful safe patient mobilization program depends upon 100% buy-in from staff, a materials and equipment system that ensures that the correct equipment is available when needed, and clear direction on what equipment should be used in a given situation. With early patient mobilization objectives, it is more important than ever that staff understand what equipment to use to safely mobilize and ensure positive patient outcomes. Learn how Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center has implemented these best practices, and key success factors for ensuring a successful program at your medical center.


  • Track B

    Behavioral Health Best Practices and Survey Preparation

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    Mark Halal, LCSW, Senior Associate, Barrins and Associates
    Jared Shapiro, DrPH(c), PhD(c), MPH, CEM, FAcEM, CHSP, CHEP, NRP, System Director of EHS, Montefiore Health System

    This presentation will include a review of the Joint Commission requirements for suicide risk reduction in inpatient behavioral health settings, the importance of the Environmental Risk Assessment, frequent survey findings and strategies for success in preparing for a Joint Commission or CMS survey.


  • Track C

    Risk Communications: From Intention to Implementation

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    Rachel Michael, M.S., CPE, CHSP, Principal Consultant, BSI EHS Services and Solutions

    Communication is a strategic component in any risk or disaster as well as in the day-to-day handling of incidents. While crisis/risk planning involves pre-paring for a host of variables, too often communications is seen as an after-thought or something that has to be done “as the situation unfolds.” In real-ity, most seemingly small on-site incidents and large-scale disasters can benefit from a robust communications plan that includes: guiding princi-ples, initial messages, spokesperson training, rapid message deployment protocols, and feedback loops. We’ll explore strategies for setting commu-nications guidelines in this era of radical transparency, preparing for known incidents, counsel on how to devise authentic and factual messages, and ways to leverage all of your facility’s communications platforms (web site, social media, local news, third party partners, etc).

  • 10:45 – 11:00 AM

     
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    Transition/Networking

  • 11:00 – 12:00 NOON

     

  • Track A

    Current Trends in Blood and Body Fluid Exposures: Sharps Injuries & Mucocutaneous Exposures

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    Dr. Amber Hogan Mitchell, MPH, CPH, President/Executive Director, International Safety Center

    As prevalence of bloodborne diseases like HCV and HIV continue to be prominent public health threats, surveillance of occupational exposures to blood and body fluids continues to be critically important to ensure the wellness of those working in healthcare. This presentation will describe national occupational incidents of sharps injuries, needlesticks, and mucocutaneous blood and body fluid exposures in healthcare settings. It will provide details about the most frequent exposure types, including profession, department/unit, safety device use, PPE use, and whether or not employees felt engineering or work practice controls could have prevented the incident from occurring.


  • Track B


  • Track C

    Disaster Mental Health
    Ali M. Gheith, MS, CEM, MEP, Director, MPA, Emergency and Disaster Management Program, School for Public Affairs and Administration Metropolitan College of New York

    In a disaster scenario, the mental health of the responders and those keeping the facility running for days and weeks on end is extremely important to successful patient and community outcomes. This session will discuss the importance of strong disaster mental health programs, and will highlight best practices in the industry.

  • 12:00 – 12:45 PM

     
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    Mid-Day Remarks/Lunch/Networking

  • 12:45 – 1:30 PM

     

  • Plenary Session

    High Reliability Organizations and Creating a Total Safety Culture

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    Steven J. Choi, MD, FAAP, Vice President, Chief Quality Officer, Associate Dean for Clinical Quality, Yale-New Haven Health System/Yale School of Medicine

    Can a hospital be as safe as an airplane? A nuclear power plant? A space rocket? Like healthcare, these industries operate under rigorous, complex and hazardous conditions, doing high stakes work where mistakes can result in great harm – yet they maintain far better safety levels, earning them recognition as High Reliability Organizations (HRO).

    Today, forward-thinking healthcare organizations and the industry overall – led by the Joint Commission – are undertaking essential changes in pursuit of high reliability. These changes involve:

    • Leadership’s commitment to achieving consistent excellence in quality and safety
    • A fully functional culture of safety throughout the organization
    • The widespread deployment of highly effective process improvement tools

    While much of the focus has been on patient safety, a true culture of safety prioritizes the safety of both patients and staff, and addresses them in an integrated, cohesive manner. Studies show that organizations that combine patient and staff safety, rather than “siloing” these efforts and addressing as totally separate issues, are far more successful at creating the culture of safety essential to achieving high reliability.

  • 1:30 – 1:45 PM

     
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    Transition/Networking

  • 1:45-2:45 PM

     

  • Track A

    Best Practices for Preventing Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Drugs

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    Elizabeth Frenzel, MD, MPH, Employee Health and Well-being, Professor, Infectious Diseases, Infection Control & Employee Health, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center

    This presentation will review the characteristics of hazardous drugs, the specific challenges in handling these materials, the health effects associated with these materials, and the current and future regulatory requirements associated with the use of these drugs. Best practices for exposure prevention including proper training, handling techniques, and spill/emergency response planning that should be in place for your facility will also be discussed.

  • Track B


  • Track C

  • 2:45 – 3:00 PM

     
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    Transition/Networking

  • 3:00-4:00 PM

     

  • Track A

    Bench to Bedside: Safety’s Role on the Cutting Edge of Medical Research

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    Nikki Thome, Biosafety Officer, Mayo Clinic

    The cutting edge of medical research is ever changing; so too must be the safety programs that support those researchers focused on bringing novel health care solutions to the public in a safe and timely manner. Through our discussion, we will examine how Safety can naturally align with and reinforce institutional values, thereby allowing the entire program to be nimble in mitigating emerging risks. Using case studies, we will look at challenges and successes that underline some of the unique hurdles associated health care research, particularly cross-functional team communication, navigating the regulatory environment, recognizing and minimizing administrative burden, reinforcing the culture of safety to a dynamic population, as well as leveraging leadership support for value-add safety initiatives. The primary value of the Mayo Clinic is to put the needs of the patient first and Safety is integrated in every step of the transfer of technology from the research bench to the patient’s bedside.

  • Track B

    Organizational Resilience

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    Tim Wren, Commercial Director, BSI Americas

    Organizational Resilience is “the ability of an organization to anticipate, prepare for, respond and adapt to incremental change and sudden disruptions in order to survive and prosper.” Learn how your EHS group can benefit from a focus on organizational resilience thereby improving your organization’s ability to anticipate and meet customer requirements, optimize operational compliance, ensure continuity of operations amidst business disruptions and minimize reputational risks.


  • Track C

    Supply Chain Assessment – How well does your system work during off-hours and emergencies?
    Jeffrey A. Ashkenase, MPA, Executive Vice President, Acurity, Inc | Nexera, Inc.

    Efficiency in emergency supply chain management means allocating adequate resources to achieve the greatest aggregate benefit for as many people as possible. Doing so requires a high degree of collaboration with your supply chain department, involving them in pertinent conversations and ensuring that they have everything they need to best support your organization in times of crisis. Learn how you can best involve your supply chain so that you can arm your hospital and safeguard emergency preparedness success.

  • 4:00 – 4:15 AM

     
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    Closing Remarks

Environmental, Health & Safety Symposium for Healthcare