EHSSENTIALS 2018
 

Sessions

Symposium Agenda – Wednesday, November 14, 2018

  • 8:00 – 8:30 AM

     
  • University Hall II – IV

    Registration & Coffee

  • 8:30 – 9:30 AM

     

  • University Hall II – IV

    Welcome & Keynote Speaker

    The Calculus of Risk: Why Zero Tolerance for Error Hurts
    Lawrence W. Steinkraus, M.D., M.P.H., Mayo Clinic

    Humans are inherently error prone. We are hard wired to explore our environment, try new things, and adapt to changing conditions. This flexibility leads to inevitable misinterpretations, wrong decisions, and error. We attempt to prevent these by engineering it out (e.g. child-proof lighters), administrative controls (rules), and training. It is important to recognize the inevitability of mistakes and develop constructive approaches in dealing with those who make errors.

    In medicine there is inherent tension between productivity and potential for accidents. This reflects a calculus of risk; a probabilistic continuum between safety and productivity. How organizations address this reflects ethical (least to most value) and moral (bad-good) constructs.

    This talk will review risk as a continuum. Risk assessment, communication, and mitigation approaches will be discussed. Expert opinion (Reason, Dekker) will be reviewed relative to the importance of the human not only as an error generator but as a safety ally.

  • 9:30 – 9:45 AM

     
  •  

    Transition/Networking

  • 9:45 – 10:45 AM

     

  • Track A –
    University Hall II
    Safety and
    Industrial Hygiene

    Blood, Bugs, Barrels, and Buzzers, Oh My! An Overview of Clinical Laboratory Safety
    Patricia J. Hlavka, MS, CSP, Mayo Clinic
    Carl D. Freyholtz, MEHS, CSP, Mayo Clinic

    Clinical laboratories can present some interesting and unique and varied challenges in safety, waste management, infection prevention and control, and emergency management. A variety of hazards, coupled with regulatory and accreditation requirements, can keep a laboratory safety officer or supervisor very busy. Identifying applicable requirements and ensuring readiness for inspections may be difficult as well. This presentation will provide an overview of clinical laboratory safety, including the regulatory and accreditation organizations that define the requirements, types of hazards, control measures, best practices, and resources available.


  • Track B –
    University Hall III
    EHS Regulations and Sustainability

    Good Manufacturing Practices & EHS: An Essential Partnership
    Benjamin Mills, BSI EHS Services and Solutions

    EHS and GMP go hand in hand.

    Each carry enormous responsibility for ensuring patients receive the life-saving therapeutics they desperately need. Without EHS compliance and management, GMP means nothing, and vice versa.

    This presentation will help healthcare professionals understand GMPs; an all-encompassing term that covers many requirements and practices. Additionally, we’ll speak to how these requirements interact, and what is required to ensure that effective systems and programs are in place.


  • Track C –
    University Hall IV
    Leadership

    The Real Cost of Hospital Staff Injuries
    Rachel Michael, M.S., CPE, CHSP, BSI EHS Services and Solutions

    Having a complete understanding of all the costs associated with healthcare staff injuries is essential to planning an effective injury reduction program, determining your investment and calculating your ROI. It’s also important for garnering staff and executive buy-in. Learn how to better understand and calculate the direct and indirect costs related to staff injuries in your organization, including costs that are often hidden; how to use that data to determine potential savings and build a business case for improved injury prevention programs at your healthcare facility; and, the strategies and best practices that leading healthcare organizations have used on the road to developing best-in- class injury prevention programs. Plus we’ll examine one of the greatest unseen impacts of all – the impact on the patient experience, medical outcomes and satisfaction scores.

  • 10:45 – 11:00 AM

     
  •  

    Transition/Networking

  • 11:00 – 12:00 NOON

     

  • Track A –
    University Hall II
    Safety and
    Industrial Hygiene

    MRI Safety

     


  • Track B –
    University Hall III
    EHS Regulations and Sustainability

    Emerging Risks and Control Strategies: Nitrous Oxide in Labor and Delivery and Radiopharmaceutical Therapies
    Allison Papenfuss, Mayo Clinic Health System – Southwest Wisconsin
    Kyle Underwood, Mayo Clinic Rochester

    Nitrous Oxide has been used for pain management during maternal labor in developed European countries for decades; it is recently gaining popularity within the United States. With that, Occupational Safety and Health Professionals are tasked with evaluating exposure risk and control efficacy and to communicate risk. The use of nitrous oxide as pain management is predicted to become an increasing practice expanding to other medical specialties such as emergency and oncology practices.

    Using the newly FDA approved radiopharmaceutical therapy drug, Lutathera, as an example, a case study will describe the necessary steps to be taken in order to control risk.


  • Track C –
    University Hall IV
    Leadership

    Cultivating a Culture of High Reliability
    Bob Williamson, MS, RN, CHSP, CSPHPH, Ascension

    In order to cultivate a culture of high reliability and transform into a high reliability organization (HRO), one must succeed in avoiding catastrophes in an environment where normal accidents can be expected to patients and employees on a regular basis. In healthcare, an HRO demonstrates its commitment to quality and safety through the study and application of human performance in complex environments that are ever changing. Additionally, for a culture of safety to permeate within an organization, leadership must define and adopt behaviors and techniques based upon established high reliability principles. This presentation will offer evidenced based approaches to achieve desired outcomes to promote employee and patient safety.

  • 12:00 – 12:45 PM

     
  • University Hall II – IV

    Mid-Day Remarks/Lunch/Networking

  • 12:45 – 1:30 PM

     

  • University Hall II – IV

    Plenary Session

    High Consequence Infectious Diseases (HCID): A categorical approach
    Pritish K. Tosh, MD, Mayo Clinic

    This presentation will discuss the traditional approach to hospital preparedness for high consequence infectious diseases (HCID), e.g. Ebola, smallpox, Anthrax, and contrast that with a novel, categorical approach being used at Mayo Clinic that focusses on operational response needs, rather than microbiologic characteristics of the pathogen.

  • 1:30 – 1:45 PM

     
  •  

    Transition/Networking

  • 1:45-2:45 PM

     

  • Track A –
    University Hall II
    Safety and
    Industrial Hygiene

  • Track B –
    University Hall III
    EHS Regulations and Sustainability

    Greening the Lab – Engaging EHS in Sustainability Improvements
    Brett Gordon, PE, MBA, Mayo Clinic
    Amanda Holloway, Mayo Clinic

    Laboratories are intensive operations that present significant opportunities for sustainability and safety improvements. Whether it’s hazardous chemical management, waste minimization, or energy conservation, creating partnerships between Facilities, Sustainability and EHS colleagues creates greater benefit and value to the organization. In this session you’ll learn ways that Mayo Clinic is capitalizing on these partnerships to reduce safety risks and environmental impacts, discuss challenges encountered with greening the laboratory efforts, and discover successful solutions and implementation strategies.


  • Track C –
    University Hall IV
    Leadership

  • 2:45 – 3:00 PM

     
  •  

    Transition/Networking

  • 3:00-4:00 PM

     

  • Track A –
    University Hall II
    Safety and
    Industrial Hygiene

    Aligning Patient Mobilization with Early Mobility Initiatives
    Tamara James, MA, CPE, CSPHP, Duke University and Health System

    A successful safe patient mobilization program depends upon 100% buy-in from staff, a materials and equipment system that ensures that the correct equipment is available when needed, and clear direction on what equipment should be used in a given situation. With early patient mobilization objectives, it is more important than ever that staff understand what equipment to use to safely mobilize and ensure positive patient outcomes. Learn how Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center has implemented these best practices, and key success factors for ensuring a successful program at your medical center.

  • Track B –
    University Hall III
    EHS Regulations and Sustainability

    Case Study: Improving Hazardous Chemical Management
    Nancy L. Wengenack, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
    Russell Sinor, CIH, CSP, Mayo Clinic
    Jeffrey C. Nesbitt, MS, CSP, CIH, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine

    Accurate information and appropriate oversight is essential to manage the tangible and regulatory risks associated with hazardous materials. The focus of this presentation is to review the drivers, background, successes in one organization’s journey toward developing a comprehensive hazardous materials management system.


  • Track C –
    University Hall IV
    Leadership

    Bench to Bedside: Safety’s Role on the Cutting Edge of Medical Research
    Nikki Thome, Mayo Clinic

    The cutting edge of medical research is ever changing; so too must be the safety programs that support those researchers focused on bringing novel health care solutions to the public in a safe and timely manner. Through our discussion, we will examine how Safety can naturally align with and reinforce institutional values, thereby allowing the entire program to be nimble in mitigating emerging risks. Using case studies, we will look at challenges and successes that underline some of the unique hurdles associated health care research, particularly cross-functional team communication, navigating the regulatory environment, recognizing and minimizing administrative burden, reinforcing the culture of safety to a dynamic population, as well as leveraging leadership support for value-add safety initiatives. The primary value of the Mayo Clinic is to put the needs of the patient first and Safety is integrated in every step of the transfer of technology from the research bench to the patient’s bedside.

  • 4:00 – 4:15 AM

     
  • University Hall II – IV

    Closing Remarks

Environmental, Health & Safety Symposium for Healthcare